Category Archives: cremations

cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD 1

Emotions of the Dying

Before cremations as part of the cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, we may be caregiving for a loved one who has been diagnosed with a terminal illness or who has a chronic disease that will eventually lead to death. While we – and much of the online and offline literature – tend to focus on how we feel while our loved ones are dying and after they die, we can often forget to consider what our dying loved one may be experiencing emotionally.

Having insight into the emotions of the dying can help us in how we respond to them. After all, we’re not the only ones experiencing loss. In fact, in a sense, we’re experiencing loss vicariously through them because they are the ones who are actually dying and actually losing their lives.

Thinking from that perspective should give us more patience, more mercy, more compassion, and more gentleness in how we deal with our dying loved ones and how we consistently respond to them, even in the times when they may be very agitated or restless and we are exhausted from trying to keep up with them.

One of the emotions that our dying loved ones may be experiencing is fear. Fear of dying is not uncommon, but if we can pinpoint what aspect of dying our loved ones are afraid of, then we might be able to find ways to ease their fear.

Some people are afraid of dying alone. Some people are afraid of dying away from home. Some people are afraid that death will be painful. Some people are afraid of what happens – or doesn’t happen – after death. Some people are afraid that their lives had no meaning or purpose and that they’ll be forgotten after they die.

Another emotion that our dying loved ones may experience is anger. This emotion may be harder for our loved ones to quantify in a way that’s understandable. Sometimes, people just aren’t ready to die. Other times, people feel like they’ve been cheated out of a full life. If our loved ones did things that brought them to the point of dying, they may be angry at themselves.

Whatever the anger is about, it often gets directed at those closest to our loved ones. There may be no way to soothe that anger, but we can minimize it by not responding to it with anger. That’s a lot easier said than done. But anger breeds anger.

If we feel our anger rising in response to our dying loved one’s anger, then it’s good to give ourselves a timeout. Walk away for a little bit. Breathe deeply. Calm down. But most of all, we should not get angry in return nor should we try to reason with it because those things will just escalate the situation.

Other emotions that our loved ones may be experiencing are guilt and regret. It’s normal when we’re facing death to reflect on our lives. In that reflection, we may find opportunities that we lost and regret that we lost them or things that we should have done or said or that we said or did that we feel guilty about.

We can help our loved ones by, if some of their regrets and guilt are about their relationship with us, is to let them know that we’ve forgiven them and we don’t hold anything against them. They may still have unresolved guilt and regrets, but we should do everything in our power to make sure that those are not related to us.

If you want information about cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD

Why Some Deaths Are Not Peaceful

Before cremations as part of the cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD, most people, if they don’t die suddenly or unexpectedly, who are dying go through a process physically, mentally, emotionally, and spiritually. For some people, the process is very peaceful as they come to the end of their lives. However, for other people, the process is not peaceful

There are many reasons why a death may not be peaceful. Much of this has to do with not actually preparing for death and having it as unfinished business.

One reason why a death may not be peaceful is that the person hasn’t thought about their life ending. Because we live in a society where death is a subject that many people studiously avoid talking about, there are people who live their entire lives without ever having the conscious realization that they will die.

Therefore, when these people get the news that they have a terminal illness or that death is approaching, it’s shocking. They are unable to quite grasp that their time is finite and it will be over soon.

With the knowledge that death is approaching, more questions than answers arise. Since these people haven’t thought about dying, they also haven’t thought about what they want in terms of care at the end of their lives and they haven’t thought about the final note to their lives, which is their funerals.

The stress and anxiety of a terminal illness can make it a lot more difficult to make clear, thoughtful, and logical decisions about end-of-life care and funeral wishes. This leads to a lack of peace.

Another reason why people might not have peaceful deaths is because they haven’t talked to their loved ones about their deaths. They may not have advance care directives in place and they may not have wills or revocable trusts to direct how their estates should be distributed and to whom they should be distributed.

Additionally, there is often unfinished business in close relationships that can lead to a lack of peace at the end of life. There may be rifts that the dying person wants to mend and they may not have time or the person they want to mend them with has no interest in reconciling.

There may be misunderstandings and hard feelings that need to be addressed and resolved and there may be no way or no time to do that when someone receives a terminal diagnosis. There may also be amends that the dying person wants to make with people who matter to them and it may be impossible to do that.

All of these can make dying an unpeaceful process.

Some people just live unhappy lives. If a person has lived unhappily, they will die unhappily. People who have been unhappy all their lives have never learned to accept life as it comes and make the best of it. Instead, they’ve felt that life has been unfair to them or they’ve gotten the short end of the stick from life, and they’ve been unhappy because of that. This can lead to unpeaceful death.

A final reason why people may not experience a peaceful death is that they’ve held on to resentments against other people or they’ve held on to regrets about things that have come and gone and can’t be changed. In short, they’ve not known how to forgive and to get and move on emotionally, which can make dying a very unpeaceful experience.

If you want information about cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD

Death Cleaning: A Gift You Leave Behind

Imagine this. After your cremation, part of the cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD, your family goes to your home to begin the process of taking care of the final details that need to be attended to after your death.

This was the home you and your spouse settled into as a final destination and where your children spent their formative years until they left the nest for college and then careers that took them all over the country or the world. This was the home where the entire immediate family, and often extended family as well, gathered for milestone events and for holidays.

Overall the time you lived there, you accumulated stuff. Some of this stuff has monetary value, has sentimental value, or is heirlooms that your family will want to keep. But the odds are good that much of the stuff in your home could have been thrown away or given away before you died.

Now your family has the task of deciding what should stay and what should go and then actually getting rid of the stuff that goes. They have a lot of work ahead of them, and that work may be accompanied by dilemmas and unnecessary stress as they go through the process of decluttering your home.

Now come back to the present, to this moment right now while you’re still alive. Is this the ideal scenario that you imagine for your family after you die? If it’s not, and for most of us, it isn’t, then now is the time to start doing something about it.

Before you go into overdrive and start throwing or giving everything away in a decluttering spread, you need to make a smart plan that takes into account the things in your home that you or your family may want to or should keep.

If you have family members close by, enlist their help in going from room to room to make an inventory and to decide what should be and shouldn’t be kept. If none of your immediate family lives close enough to help with this project, then enlist the help of a close friend.

You may find things that you don’t personally want to keep, but maybe something that one of your family members might want. This is a good way to start talking with your family about your own end-of-life planning. For those items, let your family know what you’re doing and give them the opportunity to get those things.

Be sure, however, to put a reasonable time limit – perhaps the next time they plan to visit – on how long you will keep it for them, and let them know that you will give or throw it away once that time limit has been reached.

If you have things that you have already decided to leave for certain family members, go ahead and give those things to those family members while you are alive. This will make it easier on the executor of your will or the trustee for your revocable trust, in terms of distributing inheritance items, after you die. It can also eliminate a lot of conflict among your family over stuff.

Once you know what you need to get rid of, then, on a room-by-room basis, gather together what will be thrown away and what will be given away (many charities will pick all these items up, so you don’t need to take them anywhere).

For things that you have to take somewhere to donate or that are being thrown away, you can easily set a goal of one garbage bag of each a week from one room at a time. In the course of a year, you could easily give or throw away 104 bags of clutter and have your decluttering completed.

If you want more information about cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD

Is Getting Cremation Jewelry Weird?

After cremations as part of the cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, some people have jewelry made with a small amount of their loved one’s cremation remains. The jewelry is wearable, so its purpose is to allow deceased loved ones to be close by when the jewelry is worn.

Is cremation jewelry weird? Cremations are outpacing traditional burials here in the United States. There are many reasons for this, but one of them is because of the flexibility in using cremated remains.

A portion of them can be kept or buried in an urn, a portion can be scattered in a favorite or special place, a portion can be used to help the environment (building coral reefs to sustain ocean life or mixed in with soil to plant trees and other plants), and a portion can be used to create wearable jewelry. And these are just a few of the options for using cremated remains.

But while people can understand scattering or burying some of a loved one’s cremated remains and using some of them to do something good for the environment, some people aren’t so sure about the whole idea of wearing jewelry that includes part of a deceased loved one’s cremated remains.

However, the practice of creating cremation jewelry has been around a very long time. From the 1300’s through the early 20th century, a very common tradition for people who had lost loved ones was to wear mourning rings.

These rings didn’t contain any of the cremated remains, but they gave the people wearing them a sense of having their deceased loved one near them all the time because strands of the hair of the deceased were incorporated into the creation of the ring.

While mourning rings fell out of favor as the last century passed, the idea of keeping a loved one who had died close by did not. It was that desire that led to the process of creating jewelry like rings, bracelets, lockets, and necklaces that contained a small amount of a loved one’s cremated remains.

If the thought of cremation jewelry seems a little weird to you, there are other ways to use a loved one’s cremation remains to memorialize them and keep a part of them close to you, if not too close (some people keep them even closer, having some of the cremation remains mixed with tattoo ink, and then getting a tattoo done with the special inks).

Having some of the cremation remains mixed with oil-based paints and then having a commemorative painting done with them is an option for using cremation remains that is gaining popularity. There are a number of professional painters around the country who specialize in this type of painting.

They will use special paints to create any kind of painting you want. It might be a portrait of your deceased loved one or something that represents a passion of theirs or an object that was special to them.

If a painting is not the way you want to create a permanent memorial to your loved one using some of their cremation remains, you can opt for other creative ways to incorporate them into something artistic.

An example would be to take some of the cremated remains and incorporate them with a favorite scent and melted wax to create a memory candle that you can place in a special place in your home that reminds you of your loved one.

If you want more information about cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD

Planning a Celebration of Life

After cremations, which are among the cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD, you will want to have a funeral or memorial service that honors and pays tribute to the life of your loved one who has died. This service gives you and your family, along with other family, friends, and acquaintances, an opportunity to express your farewells to your loved one, as well as to honor their memory and to find meaning in their death.

Funeral services or memorial services have traditionally been held before or after cremations to remember a loved one who has died. These types of services often follow a traditional format, although typically funeral services are much more formal than memorial services, that includes readings of poetry, prose, and/or scriptures, eulogies given by people who were close to the deceased and knew them well, spiritual comfort and encouragement, and musical selections.

These types of services are designed to help the bereaved family and those who knew the loved one to mourn collectively and to be able to offer and receive support and sympathy. Although that need never goes away, there are some types of services that have evolved in the last few decades that shift the focus of the services away death and toward life.

The reason for this is that some people feel like the traditional ceremonies in funeral services and memorial services are too impersonal. Because both funeral services and memorial services tend to be performed actively by a few people while the audience is passive and doesn’t participle, it can seem that most of the people who attend these types of services don’t get to express, in a meaning way, how they cared and felt about the person who died.

That has led to the rise of a service that is known as a celebration of life. Celebrations of life can be held in conjunction with funeral services or memorial services, or they can be the only service that is held to remember a loved one who has died.

Celebrations of life can be highly personalized in format and tone. They are specifically designed not to be sad or somber services. Celebrations of life are characterized by prolific storytelling, as memories of the deceased are shared by those who attend, and laughter and smiles. This is because celebrations of life are specifically geared toward remember the positive impact of the deceased on the world around them while they were living.

Planning a celebration of life involves much of the same preparation that planning a funeral service or a memorial service involves. Your funeral director will help guide you as you make the arrangements for this type of service to honor the memory of your loved one’s life.

There are several aspects you’ll need to take into consideration as you plan a celebration of life. You will need to decide the tone and the format. Many people simply gather and share food and memories of the deceased informally.

You’ll need to decide, if food is part of the celebration of life, whether you and your family will provide it personally, it will be catered, or it will be served in a restaurant. That will drive the location, date, and time of the celebration of life.

If there are special activities that you want to include in the celebration of life, then you will need to plan and organize those. Finally, you’ll want to decide how you want to notify people of the celebration of life, and whether you want to leave it open for public attendance or whether you want it to be a private event that only people you invite attend.

If you want more information about celebrations of life and cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD

Donating Your Body for Scientific Research

Before death and cremations as part of the cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD, you may decide that you want to donate your body for scientific research, in the hope that your donation may help people in the future, as researchers look for clues and solutions to many medical issues, problems, and diseases using whole body donations.

If you decide that you want to donate your body for scientific research, make sure that your family knows your wishes and be sure to write it in the final instructions for your life.

Next, you’ll want to do some legwork to find out how the body donation process works, what you need to do in advance, and to decide where you want your body to be donated. It’s important to remember that there may be some cases where your body is not eligible for donation, so make sure you have a backup plan in place for your family if that’s the case so that they will know what you want done.

The first part of donating your body for scientific research is finding the organization that you want to donate your body to. Most universities with medical schools have whole body donation programs. There are also some non-academic organizations that accept whole body donations. Look online to see what universities and organizations in your local area will take bodies donated for scientific research.

Once you find the academic and private organizations that you’re interested in donating your body to after you die, contact them and pre-register with them for whole body donation. The reason you want to have several possible places to donate your body to is that while one organization may not accept the donation, another one might.

Each organization that accepts whole body donations after death has different criteria that determines whether they can accept the donations. So, by pre-registering with several of them, you have a better possibility of one of them accepting your donation.

After you’ve pre-registered with the academic institutions and private organizations that you want to donate your body to, be sure to find out what your family and you are obligated for by participating in their program. Most body donation programs will pay for transportation from the funeral home to their location and for cremation after your body has been processed for research, but you need to make sure that is the case.

Be sure that your family knows about your wish to have your body donated to science. Your loved ones may have envisioned a funeral with a burial (which can still be done with your cremated remains) or some other type of funeral, and they may need some time to adjust to what you desire to do with your body after you die.

Make sure that all your legal paperwork includes your desire to have your body donated for scientific research after you die. This can be part of your advanced directive, your will, or your revocable trust.

Always make sure that you have a backup plan included in your final wishes in the event that the academic institutions and private organizations you’ve registered with can’t accept your body for their donation programs. This could include direct cremation or a funeral service followed by cremation.

If you want information about the cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD

The Most Common Family Heirlooms

After cremations as part of the cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, one of the things that the surviving family members will do is go through the family heirlooms and distribute them according to the deceased’s wishes or, if they did not specify who they should go to, to the family members who want them.

Family heirlooms are anything the family has considered to be valuable and has been passed down through the family for several generations. These can be items of monetary value, such as antiques or rare collections, or they can be items with sentimental value. And, while some family heirlooms are very old, some may be newer, but become family heirlooms because they had so much value in the life of the family who has lost a loved one.

However, in almost family, there are some common heirlooms that the family keeps and passes on to future generations.

Jewelry is one common family heirloom. It may be a set of pearls, a wedding band set, or a set of cufflinks that has been in the family for a very long time. Often, in the case of wedding rings, grandmothers and mothers will specify that they want a specific granddaughter or daughter to have their wedding rings when they die.

Timepieces are another common family heirloom. Whether it’s a pocket watch (that may or may not run) or a grandfather clock, these often make their way through successive generations of a family.

It might surprise you to learn that furniture is a very common family heirloom. The furniture may have been built by a grandfather or great-grandfather, making it special and valuable, or the furniture may be an exquisite china cabinet or piano that has been in the family for generations.

Recipes, especially the handwritten recipe cards, are also a very common family heirloom. Having Grandma’s recipe for apple pie or Mom’s recipe for perfect biscuits is something that each generation will cherish. And when they cook the recipes of those who have gone before them, they are reminded of how much they were loved and cherished.

Bibles and other kinds of books are also included in common family heirlooms. Some families have Bibles that belonged to great-great grandparents, and they often contain, not only family history, but also treasures such as notes or old newspaper clippings that give insights into life at that time.

If you’ve had family members who were in the military at any point in American history, then the odds are good that your family has some of these common heirlooms. These can include uniforms, dog tags, medals, and boots.

Handmade quilts are also a common family heirloom. Most quilts that have been made in the last 50 years or so were sewn using regular cloth and sewing machines. Handmade quilts, on the other hand, were hand-sewn, using scraps of cloth from other sewing projects. Some of them were made to help keep the family warm in wintertime, so they have a nice, thick layer of insulating material between the patches of cloth, making them both beautiful and practical.

Collections of things are also common family heirlooms. These could include sports card collections, stamp collections, coin collections, and car collections. While some may have a lot of value, families don’t generally want to sell them.

If you want more information about cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD

Executor 101: Selling Real Estate

After cremations as part of the cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD, the executor of the deceased person’s estate is responsible for handling all the matters of the estate, which may include selling the deceased’s house and distributing the proceeds among the beneficiaries of the estate.

Your loved one may have already specified what they want done with any real estate they own, include their personal home. They may have decided to leave it to one of the beneficiaries of their estate. Or they may have specified that it be sold and the proceeds distributed equally among the beneficiaries or to go to a specific beneficiary.

Much of what will be done with your loved one’s house will depend on whether it is paid for, has a mortgage, or a reverse mortgage. These scenarios may override your loved one’s stated wishes.

If the house was owned outright by your loved one, and they wanted it to go to a specific beneficiary, then this is perhaps your simplest scenario. The beneficiary gets the house, and then they can keep it or sell it as their personal property.

However, if the house has a mortgage on it, then the beneficiary will need to get a new mortgage in their name to take ownership of the house. If the beneficiary is unable or unwilling to do this, then the house can be sold to pay the mortgage off. Any money remaining after the mortgage is paid off will go to the designated beneficiary.

If the house has a reverse mortgage on it, then it belongs to the bank after your loved one dies, and the beneficiary (or beneficiaries) get nothing.

Your loved one may have also specified that their house be sold and the money split between the beneficiaries. If the house is paid for, this will be a simple matter of selling the house and splitting the money.

However, if the house has a mortgage, then the mortgage must be paid off before any of the sales proceeds can be distributed to the beneficiaries.

If you will be selling your loved one’s house as part of your role of the executor of the estate, you should contact a real estate professional as soon as possible. A real estate professional can give you insights about comparable home prices in the area and they can make suggestions about repairs or upgrades that will make the home more marketable.

It’s not a bad idea, if your selling a home as the executor of an estate, to get the house appraised by a professional appraiser. The appraisal value listed on tax documents is not necessarily truly what the house and property are worth. A professional appraiser can give you the house and property’s true value so that you can share that with beneficiaries and you can have an idea of what the price it should be listed for.

If the proceeds of the house are to be split among beneficiaries, and one beneficiary wants to buy the house, you cannot let that beneficiary buy the house at a price that’s lower than its market value, because that’s unfair to the rest of the beneficiaries. Use the appraiser’s price as a starting point to talk with all the beneficiaries about what price they’d be willing to have one beneficiary buy the house for.

If you want more information about cremation services offered in Greenbelt, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD

What are Death Doulas?

Since there is no way for us to know when death exactly happens, funeral homes that offer cremation services in Beltsville, MD may also provide death doulas as part of their service to help us plan and prepare for our own death. We spend a lot of time in our own lives, perhaps, avoiding thinking much or deeply about our own deaths. It’s as though if we don’t think about death, then it won’t happen.

But when the ravages of age catch up with someone we love or a terminal illness is diagnosed in a family member or close friend, it’s much more difficult to avoid the reality that death happens.

However, we still may not be at a point where we consider our own mortality, and that, sooner or later, we also will close the final chapter in our lives by taking our last breath. We may seek to delay the inevitability of death with medications, procedures, and surgeries that may buy us a little more time. While these may provide quality of life for a while, at some point, our bodies will wear out and nothing will be able to stop us from the next natural step in the cycle of life, which is death.

We may take care of the things we’ll need at the end of life and when we die, such as advanced directives, powers of attorney, and wills or revocable living trusts, and believe that we are have done all we need to do to prepare for our own deaths.

But there will come a time when facing the reality of our own deaths can no longer be avoided.

However, there’s a difference between dying and dying well. Dying well includes making sure that the people you love and will be leaving behind are taken care of, that you’ve left a meaningful legacy for your family, and you want to make sure that your last wishes – or those of a loved one – are fulfilled in a way that shows respect and honor.

Death doulas are people who are professionally trained to help people who are dying (and their families) die well. A death doula has extensive and firsthand knowledge of the dying process and can offer the wisdom of that experience. A death doula can also help the dying loved one’s family understand and accept death as natural, and can help prepare them for when death finally comes.

Death doulas also encourage the dying person and their family to have healthy conversations about death and they can help the entire family plan for death.

Death doulas have many practical functions are very beneficial. They provide education about what happens as the body dies, and will let the family know when death is imminent. They advocate for the dying person (if they do not have a designated medical power of attorney) when the dying person is unable to express their own wishes.

Death doulas are effective coordinators between medical professionals, family members, and caregivers, which can relieve a lot of stress on the family as death approaches. They also provide companionship for the dying person and offer family members an opportunity to take brief (a few hours) breaks from caregiving to attend to their own needs.

Although death doulas aren’t certified, they are being added to the staffs of palliative care and hospice care agencies across the country. Death doulas go through a rigorous training program that qualifies them to very ably assist dying people and their families through the end-oflife process.

If you want more information about cremation services offered in Beltsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.

cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD

Finding Comfort after the Death of a Loved One

After a cremation services in Burtonsville, MD, you may feel as though the world has ended with the death of your loved one. Life ahead without them may look dark, empty, and hopeless. You may be at a loss as to what to do next. These are all normal feelings in the grieving process as the reality of death sets in.

Grieving is a healthy response to loss. However you grieve and whatever you feel or think, while it may share some general commonalities with what grief looks like, is unique to you and you need to take the time to walk through the fire of it. The grief will never leave, but it will change into a form that you can manage and lets you move ahead with life.

As the initial stages of grief subside, you may find that loneliness and emptiness persist. There are some very tangible things that you can do to find comfort that will ease those feelings.

Not all of these things are something you might want to do right away because in the early stages of grief, your emotions are running high and you aren’t thinking clearly. However, some of them may help take the edges off of the pain you are feeling.

One of the best ways to find comfort after the death of a loved one is connecting with other people. We have a natural tendency to withdraw from social contact when we’re extremely emotion and are feeling vulnerable and fragile. After all, who wants to embarrass themselves by breaking down and sobbing at the mere mention of their loved one’s name?

However, if you have family members close by, they can provide a lot of comfort, because you’re sharing the same loss. If you don’t have family members nearby, there are still some ways that you can connect with other people.

A great way is to join a grief support group. The funeral home is able to provide you with community grief resources and there are also grief support groups that meet online. It may take a little time to find the right mix of people in a support group that you feel comfortable with (this is true of any type of group), but stay with it until you do.

Another way to connect with people is by volunteering in a community organization that serves the needs of a segment of the population. Not only will you feel better because you’re serving others, but you will meet a lot of nice people in the process.

If you’re religious, then the Bible (the Psalms can be particularly comforting), prayer, going to church services, and talking with a trusted clergy member are excellence ways to find comfort after your loved one has died. If you’re not religious, find a quiet place outside that’s full of nature’s wonders and make that your comfort place.

You can find comfort after the death of a loved one by pursuing your own interests. There are many things we set aside as life goes on, and finding those things again after the death of a loved one may provide solace. They are certainly a way to assuage some of emptiness and loneliness.

If you want more information about cremation services offered in Burtonsville, MD, you can talk with our expert staff at Donald V. Borgwardt Funeral Home, P.A. You can drop by our funeral home at 4400 Powder Mill Rd., Beltsville, MD, 20705, or you can contact us today at (301) 937-1707.